Spay & Neuter

 

 

Spaying

 

The following is a thorough description of the entire procedure we perform at The Cat's Meow so you more fully understand what is involved. It is our policy to provide for each patient’s needs as they arise, so that individual attention to the safety and comfort of your pet is assured. This allows the doctor to provide the best for her patient and avoids the assembly line low cost approach. Although we understand that occasionally cost alone is the primary concern, we feel that our clients desire the best for their kitties and we, therefore, do not attempt to compete with low cost programs by lowering our standards.  

 

If the patient will allow, an exam is performed to ensure that the patient is healthy and fit for anesthesia.  We prefer that fasted blood work be performed prior to the procedure to check the status of the kidneys and liver.  According to weight, physical status, and age, the anesthetics and pain medications are determined. Anesthesia is induced with the chosen protocol.  Throughout the procedure, she will breathe in pure oxygen (mixed with inhalant anesthetic if needed).  The eyes are lubricated to prevent dryness during the procedure.  IV fluids are administered throughout the procedure

 

The urinary bladder is emptied, and the surgical site on the abdomen is shaved. The patient is positioned on the surgical table and the surgical site is cleaned with surgical disinfectant. Local anesthetic is used to numb the areas where incisions will be made. 

 

While the patient is being prepared by the technician, the doctor “scrubs in” with disinfectant and applies surgical attire.  A sterile instrument pack is opened, and a sterile surgical drape is applied covering the entire area and exposing only the surgical site. During the procedure, the technician monitors the vitals such as heart and respiratory rates and rhythms and blood pressure.

 

An incision is made through the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and abdominal muscle layer.  Both of the ovaries are removed.  The uterus may or may not be removed, depending on doctor preference and the status of the uterus (pregnant, infected, etc).  We frequently do not remove the uterus, as problems with the uterus most often occur only in the face of hormone production from the ovaries.  The tissue ligatures and incision closure are performed using techniques, patterns, and suture materials determined to be the best for the patient.

 

The patient is allowed to recover from anesthesia in the hospital ward, where she is closely observed for any problems. The cat remains in the hospital overnight so she can completely recover without hurting herself by running or jumping or falling while under effects of anesthesia and pain medication.  Once she goes home, it is best if the environment remains relatively quiet (kept separate from other cats that like to play or fight, children, dogs, loud noises, etc.) to help the healing process.

 

A small amount of swelling may be the body’s reaction to an incision and suture material and is usually considered normal. If there is a large amount of swelling, redness, or discharge or the cat is depressed or not eating, we should examine the kitty immediately. Generally there are no problems, but it is better to be safe than sorry-please ask if you are unsure.

 

Having your cat spayed not only prevents her from cycling in and out of heat, but also decreases behavioral problems and reduces the risk of medical problems such as mammary cancer and endocrine diseases in the future. If your cat is not specifically going to be used for a breeding program, spaying is definitely the best decision. We recommend having the procedure performed at approximately 4-6 months of age. Please contact us with any questions!

 

 

 

"Neutering" or Orchiectomy/Orchidectomy

 

If the patient will allow, an exam is performed to ensure that he is healthy and fit for anesthesia.  We prefer that fasted blood work be performed prior to the procedure to check the status of the kidneys and liver.  According to weight, physical status, and age, the anesthetics and pain medications are determined. Anesthesia is induced with the chosen protocol.  Throughout the procedure, he will breathe in pure oxygen (mixed with inhalant anesthetic if needed).  The eyes are lubricated to prevent dryness during the procedure. 

 

The surgical site is prepared by removal of the fur and scrubbing the area using surgical disinfectant. Local anesthetic is injected into the scrotum to numb the surgical site. As the technician is preparing the patient, the doctor is disinfecting and applying gloves.

 

A testicle is isolated within the scrotum and a small incision is made directly over it. The testicle is pulled out so the spermatic cord and vessel can be seen. The vessel is ligated (tied off to prevent bleeding), and the testicle is removed. The remaining cord is placed back into the scrotum and the procedure is repeated on the other testicle.  No sutures or liquid stitches are required.

 

The patient is allowed to recover from anesthesia in the hospital ward, where he is closely observed for any problems.  The procedure for neutering a cat is technically less difficult, less time-consuming, and less invasive than for spaying, so we allow cats to go home the same day as the procedure. It is best if the environment remains relatively quiet (kept separate from other cats that like to play or fight, children, dogs, loud noises, etc.) to help the healing process.

 

A small amount of swelling may be the body’s reaction to an incision and suture material and is usually considered normal. If there is a large amount of swelling, redness, or discharge or the cat is depressed or not eating, we should examine the kitty immediately. Generally there are no problems, but it is better to be safe than sorry-please ask if you are unsure.

 

   

  

© 2018 by The Cat's Meow Veterinary Hospital.

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SERVICES

- Wellness
- Vaccinations
- Surgery (including laser)

- Dentistry
- Internal Medicine
- Boarding

OPENING HOURS

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM (Normal)

8:30 AM - 4:30 PM (Current)

Weekdays

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM (Normal)

CLOSED (Current)

Saturday

 

CLOSED

Sunday

ADDRESS

4948 Overton Ridge Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76132

 

Mail: tcm@catsmeowvets.com
Tel:  817-263-5287